//Recognizing Quality Innovation

Recognizing Quality Innovation

2018-05-25T17:20:08+00:00

Honoring those in the mobility industry who demonstrate ability and talent to further innovation and broaden the impact of

Quality & Me

Subir shares his own personal efforts to work toward continuous improvement within his own community, among his friends and family.

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Books by Subir

The Power of LEO
The Ice Cream Maker
The Power of Design for Six
The Power of Six Sigma
Organization 21c

The Subir Chowdhury Medal of Quality Leadership was established by the Society of Automotive Engineers along with the Subir and Malini Chowdhury Foundation. Established in 2010, the award is honors individuals and organizations who demonstrate ability and talent to further innovation and broaden the impact of “quality” in mobility engineering, design and manufacture.

This award is offered in the spirit of my lifetime of work toward quality in the engineering professions. It’s purpose is to recognize the benefit to our global society when engineers practice the utmost quality in their work. The SAE website says that the award recognizes, “the power of quality in engineering.” I may add that we use excellence of this type to broaden our vision of what is achievable.

Certainly, I hope that this award enhances the public perception of SAE International as an organization that celebrates contributions of all individuals and their work in this area. My aim comports with theirs: to demonstrate “the deeper scope and reach of SAE International” and engineering professions to the public.

I honor medal recipients – past and present:

LOGO_sae_international

Recipient Award Employer
Gerald Johnson 2017 General Motors
Shahjada Ahmed Pahlovy, PhD 2016 Dynax Corporation
Glen A. Barton 2011 Caterpillar Inc
James D. Power 2010 JD Power And Associates

What is the cost of a little white lie?

We have all lied at some point in our lives, even if it’s one of those “little white lies” you told your mother. The thing is, lying is never acceptable. Unless and until you replace lying with being straightforward, you’ll never have a caring mindset.

How will you embrace the truth?

A friend communicated a story to me about Alan Mulally, the former CEO of Ford. When Mulally first joined the organization, he gathered his senior management team together to identify what needed to change at Ford. In a nutshell, Mulally asked his team to color code their initiatives red, yellow, or green. Red meant things were in bad shape—for example, a launch date might be missed. Yellow meant an initiative wasn’t going well, and green meant the initiative was on track.

Making Choices

Subir reflects on his arrival into the United States with the promise of a job, only to find that the promise is broken. Practically penniless, Subir searches deep into his soul. Undefeated and undeterred, Subir pursues professors and department heads until he meets one who asks: You went to 20 departments, and now it is the 21st one; if I say no to you what you would do? Subir tells him, "I will go to the 22nd." This is Subir's story, not of conquest, but of perseverance in the face of making difficult choices.

What do you do with a toothpick?

Think about the last time you picked up a piece of trash on the sidewalk, helped your neighbor without being asked, or thanked a co-worker for critical but necessary feedback. These are all small actions, but again, the sum is more powerful than the individual actions.